Blossom hues

Why is it that everyone considers their ego to be the center of the universe? The rest of the creation in the universe is either good or bad, in relation to their ego.

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Jill Bolte Taylor, a brain scientist, had a massive stroke on December 10, 1996. She survived! Today she lives on to tell you the experience that gave her a glimpse of a new dimension.

Watch this amazing video.

http://blog.ted.com/2008/03/jill_bolte_tayl.php

Disclaimer: Through this post, neither do I intend to put down Singaporeans, nor do I claim that I speak perfect English. These are my observations about Singlish. That’s all.

I got the idea for this post during an irksome training session, where the instructor was droning on in Singlish. For the uninitiated, Singlish is Singaporean English, very much like Tanglish (Tamil + English) or Hinglish (Hindi + English). It is very easy to learn the language. Here is what you have to learn (or unlearn):

1. Singlish advocates economy of words. As a result, you do not need to care about grammar rules.

If you want to know the time, don’t waste your time and civility by asking “Excuse me, what time is it now.” Just ask “now what time aah.”

2. Don’t be surprised if you get a “can can” or “cannot” for a yes/no question.

3. Do not pronounce the last syllable of any word. “What do you want” becomes “Wa yoo wan“. Also, “peak hour” becomes “pee owa” :p

4. Singaporeans believe in living in the present. So, they do not use past tense in their speech. :p

Here is a gem of an example: “He talk talk talk, never stop.

As you can see in the above example, they find it ok to repeat the verb to emphasize the action.

5. “Never” replaces “didn’t

I never see you” does not imply that I’m blind or you are invisible. It just means “I didn’t see you

6. Append sentences with “lah“, “leh“, “lor” much like how you would append “da” and “di” when speaking in Tamil.

7. Append “mah” to sentences when you want to indicate something obvious.

She boss mah! Can do anything

8. “Already” becomes “orready” and is used very often.

9. There are a number of Hokkien phrases thrown in during any conversation. It is quite difficult to learn them all.

This is not all. There are more and more rules, but the above rules are sufficient to survive daily life. If you are interested to know more, read the wikipedia entry for Singlish. Or go to this site.

Have a nice weekend!
 

“OK….that was easy….I mean, creating a WordPress blog. But what do I write about? Who is my muse?”

This was what I had saved in my draft days ago. However, the confusion about writing lasted only until I received something to boast about. <Grinning ear to ear>

Yay!! I got an award!

best blog guesser

Thank you, Tharini. (I’m not Indianomad anymore. Blossom is my new name)

Reading a lot of mommy blogs (and a few non-mommy blogs) made me want to blog my experiences and thoughts on life.  A very special hug to dear SuperNova who suggested my nom de plume and a name for this blog.

Atlast, I’ve started blogging. Now, the challenge is to keep this blog alive.


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  • Tharini: Because of the cosmic delusion of maya. Which is the creator of the 'I', creating duality and firing up the ego. Is rough but hey...its the way we
  • Blossom: Hi Kodi's Mom. It's nice to see your comment here. Welcome to my blog. Have you been to Singapore?
  • Kodi's Mom: Singlish is hilarious! when my brother first moved to SG, he'd speak like this and we'd make so much fun of his 'orreadys' and 'lahs'...!

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